8.24.19

Available Light on view at the Millard Sheets Art Center in Pomona through September 22.

02.01.19

The Image, The Event, The Body: artists Nicole Miller, Christopher Richmond, Miljohn Ruperto and Jennifer West moderated by Ryan Linkof, Curator of Film at the Lucas Museum for Narrative Art

Ryan Linkof will be in dialogue with Miller, Richmond, Ruperto and West to examine common themes that unite the work of these multimedia artists. Through their diverse practices, each artist has engaged with the tension between representation and reality – with the power of images to simultaneously reveal and conceal. The conversation will examine the artists’ use of narrative structure, materiality and a post-documentary approach to lens-based practice.  

photola.com

12.21.18

“Space” Is the Place at Moskowitz Bayse by Shana Nys Dambrot (LA Weekly)

“Space” is the current exhibition at Moskowitz Bayse Gallery, from multimedia artist Christopher Richmond, and it’s a multidimensional trip — literally. A suite of photographs as well as sculptural works and energetic drawings support the centerpiece of the project: the three-channel, feature-length video Hyperway. With shades of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Solarisand Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, the film is an epic work of sci-fi surrealism with a decidedly humorous and philosophical bent.

With the California desert standing in for alien planets, and a Honda doing the work of a rocket ship, our protagonists have adventures in consciousness that prompt questions about the nature of reality, the purpose of art, the potential of unfettered imagination and what it means to boldly go. Though it’s on view during regular gallery hours through Dec. 22, on Sunday, Dec. 23, the gallery hosts a matinee screening of the entire film, popcorn provided.

laweekly.com

12.16.18

Cinematic Space: A conversation with Christopher Richmond and Nicholas Barlow, Curatorial Assistant for Contemporary Art and the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at LACMA

Moskowitz Bayse is pleased to present Christopher Richmond in Conversation with Nicholas Barlow, coinciding with Richmond’s exhibition Space currently on view at the gallery. The speakers will discuss a range of topics related to his most recent work Hyperway (2018), featured in the exhbibition including cinematic vs. scientific representations of space, expanded universes, canonicity, continuity, and the end of the universe. Nicholas Barlow is the Curatorial Assistant for Contemporary Art and the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at LACMA.

moskowitzbayse.com

11.18.18

Space 2, DXIX Projects, November 18 – December 22, 2018

DXIX is pleased to presenSpace 2, an exhibition featuring a new video work by Los Angeles based artist Christopher Richmond. Space 2 concludes an expansive body of work that Richmond calls the Hyperway made up of photography, video, sculpture, and drawing. DXIX presented Richmond’s exhibition Moon-Watcher in 2017, which featured the video Bone Cut(2017) also from Richmond’s Hyperway. Space 2 is part of a 2-part exhibition with Space, taking place simultaneously at Moskowitz Bayse Gallery from November 10 to December 22.

The centerpiece of Space 2 at DXIX is Viewing Stone (2018). Accompanied by an original score by Aileen Bryant, Viewing Stone glimpses a pastoral vision of a desolate asteroid serenely wandering through the vacuum of space. In a series of long slow-motion shots, the camera hones in on the contours of the asteroid’s perforated and wrinkled exterior. As shadows shift and transform its surface, a feeling of tranquility intermingles with foreboding danger. Throughout cinema, asteroids have been confined to apocalyptic symbols of impending doom. Here, the viewer is presented with a far different vision: the juxtaposition of reality and simulation, creation and annihilation, the beginning and the end. Like Suiseki, the Japanese art of stone appreciation, the asteroid is presented as a mystical creation like many of the characters in Richmond’s work, as it slowly travels through space.

Richmond challenges viewers to envision alternative realities and devise their own images and theories of the unknown. In his photographs, drawings, and sculpture, Richmond points to the various narrative strands of his video work. Black holes with gastrointestinal tracts swallow suns, wormholes create highways across space and time, and universes crash into one another like drunken eclipses. With similarity to his video work, Richmond’s photographs, drawings, and sculpture tend to obscure as much as they reveal.

dxixprojects.com

11.10.18

Space, Moskowitz Bayse, November 10 – December 22, 2018

Moskowitz Bayse is pleased to present Space, Christopher Richmond’s second solo presentation with the gallery. New photographs, drawings, and sculpture accompany Hyperway (2018), the monumental three-channel feature-length video that occupies the east gallery.

Hyperway evokes all that hyperspace promises. Astronauts depart on an intergalactic journey from Los Angeles to an alien world in an air-conditioned Honda Civic, taking them through California desert highways and exotic planetary landscapes. On this surreal odyssey, they explore and debate a diverse range of topics – What is the purpose of travel? What is an earthling? How does the artist Daniel Buren’s essay, “The Function of the Studio,” relate to interstellar travel? As their physical and mental transformation takes hold, imagination overcomes senses and becomes a reality. Simultaneously, a celestial being, billions of years old, questions the multiverse. A colossal asteroid hurtles past distant stars, foreshadowing a cataclysmic event.

Richmond challenges viewers to envision alternative realities and to devise their own images and theories of the unknown. In his photographs, drawings, and sculpture, Richmond points to the various narrative strands of his video work. Black holes with gastrointestinal tracts swallow suns, wormholes create highways across space and time, and universes crash into one another like drunken eclipses. Like Richmond’s video work, his photographs, drawings, and sculpture obscure as much as they reveal.

Viewing Stone (2018), a second new video work by the artist, will be the centerpiece of the exhibition Space 2, concurrently on view at DXIX Projects from November 18 through December 22. Viewing Stone glimpses a pastoral vision of a desolate asteroid serenely wandering through the vacuum of space. In a series of long slow-motion shots, the camera hones in on the contours of the asteroid’s perforated and wrinkled exterior. As shadows shift and transform its surface, a feeling of tranquility intermingles with foreboding danger. Throughout cinema, asteroids have been confined to apocalyptic symbols of impending doom. Here, the viewer is presented with a far different vision: the juxtaposition of reality and simulation, creation and annihilation, the beginning and the end. Like Suiseki, the Japanese art of stone appreciation, the asteroid is presented as a mystical creation like many of the characters in Richmond’s work, as it slowly travels through space. 

Rather than working from a script, Richmond writes a story and an outline, and allows the actors, professional and non-professional, to improvise on the central topics at the focus. Though this process results in a vast array of footage that never makes the screen, it allows for close and often reoccurring collaboration with a community of artists, writers, filmmakers, and musicians that shapes, twists, deconstructs, and reassembles in a reordering integral to Richmond’s practice. Hyperway stars Jan Tumlir, Christina Catherine Martinez, and Augusto Aguilera, and features an original score by Brandon Rolle and new music from Xina Xurner. Viewing Stone features new original music by Aileen Bryant.  

Christopher Richmond (b. 1986) earned his MFA from the Roski School of Art and Design at USC in 2012. His video and photographic works have been widely exhibited in galleries around the world, and his work can be found in notable collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). He lives and works in Los Angeles.

moskowitzbayse.com


09.23.18

Exploring a Multiverse: A conversation with Christopher Richmond and Artillery Associate Editor Christopher Michno – Brand Library & Arts Center, Sept 23, 3 pm

Join artist Christopher Richmond and writer Christopher Michno for a screening of Richmond’s work Rendezvous, followed by a brief conversation and Q&A. The event takes places on the occasion of the launch of Artillery Magazine’s Utopia Issue, which includes a feature on Christopher Richmond’s work written by the magazine’s Associate Editor Christopher Michno.

artillerymag.com

08.24.18

The Map is the Territory, Bregenz Biennale 2018, curated by Albert Allgaier and Sophie Lapalu

New work in the Bregenz Biennale 2018

bb18.at

06.14.18

Deep Time, organized by Kylie White, Moskowitz Bayse, July 14 – August 18, 2018

Rachael Browning, Jack Hoyer, Niki Logis, Aaron Morse, Ken Price, Christopher Richmond, Ian Lawrence Campbell Swordy, Kylie White.

Penrose 2 (2018) on display in Deep Time at Moskowitz Bayse.

The Penrose Series attempts to organize the various narrative strands of Christopher Richmond’s film, video, and photographic work. The drawings are rendered in ink on paper and taped vinyl. Black holes with gastrointestinaltracts swallow suns, wormholes transport highways across space and time, and universes crash into one another like drunken eclipses. The title, ‘Penrose,’ refers to the Penrose Diagram developed by Sir Roger Penrose. A British mathematician, physicist, and philosopher of science, Penrose calculated many of the features of black holes. Richmond’s Penrosedrawings are two-dimensional maps of spacetime between two distinct points. The vertical axis represents space and the horizontal represents time. The Penrose Series suggests that drawing a map is not so different from telling a story. Map-making is a form of visual communication, enabling individuals to visually think with data. However, like Richmond’s video work, the Penrose drawings obscure as much as they reveal. They challenge viewers to envision alternative realities and to devise their own images and theories of the unknown. In the words of Sir Penrose: “And these little things may not seem like much but after a while they take you off on a direction where you may be a long way off from what other people have been thinking.” Richmond invites viewers to enter his unique universes, which impose no limits on their imagination.

moskowitzbayse.com

05.23.17

Moon-watcher, DXIX Projects, April 23 – June 17, 2017

DXIX Projects is pleased to present Moon-Watcher, a solo exhibition by Los Angeles based artist Christopher Richmond. Taking its title from the main ape in Arthur C. Clarke’s novel, 2001: A Space Odyssey, written concurrently while collaborating with Stanley Kubrick for his film, the exhibition continues Richmond’s exploration into the uninterrupted interplay of images and time and sound — removing all nonessential elements except for a singular gesture in the now.

​In the main exhibition space the viewer can see the video Bone Cut (2017) in which Richmond focuses on the memorable introduction of the future in Kubrick’s 2001. In this historic scene, Kubrick juxtaposes two seemingly unrelated objects in the air, the earth-bound bone and the celestial spaceship orbiting earth, squeezing human history into one cut.   In Richmond’s Bone Cut (2017), the viewer is mesmerized by the bone endlessly spiraling in the air. Yet, there is no progression from this primitive tool to the more advanced one — the spaceship, the future. The viewer is left in a state of suspension.  

The work seeks to remind the viewer of some of cinema’s most salient technological imperatives: to break the causal rule of before and after as well as to overcome the Newtonian law of gravity. The bone appears to float and rotate endlessly in the never-ending moment. To obtain this effect, Richmond utilized match cuts as in 2001 — an edit that matches movement or objects to create a sense of “seamless” transition from one shot to the next. Ignoring the current trend of digital processing — the ability to render 3D forms and rotate them seamlessly with 3D software — Richmond utilized a far more laborious technique. He edited multiple shots with match cuts to create this continual motion that in rapid succession both hides and reveals itself.

Elsewhere, photographs are placed in a small dark corridor. These photographic works explore notions of subject and the ordinary imbued with enigmatic powers and projected into the vacuum of space. 

Working in film, video, and photography Richmond explores identity and intimacy through the lens of science fiction and myth. Often employing masks, puppets, and everyday objects, his work merges the real world with handcrafted phantasmagoria populated by sentient creatures, alien beings, and “big dumb objects” that explore the human condition and the search for meaning.

dxixprojects.com

05.20.17

Bone Cut (2017) with Fake Estates Live

Christopher Richmond’s BONE CUT
With Live Score by FAKE ESTATES
In conjunction with Christopher Richmond’s Moon-Watcher, now on view at DXIX Projects through June 3rd, we are excited to present Bone Cut with Live Score by Fake Estates on May 20th at 3:00pm.

From 2016 to 2017, Christopher Richmond culled through a well of original footage to thread together a hypnotic succession of match cuts to create Bone Cut (2017), a poetic reflection on Kubrick’s 2001 and cinema’s relationship with time. After completing his edit, Richmond turned to longtime collaborator, Matt Gangi, to help design the soundscape. One part field recording, one part electronic soundscape, the final composition transports the viewer across a space-time abyss fueled by synthesizer, birds, dissonant crescendos, and wind.

On May 20th, Los Angeles based sound group, Fake Estates (Matt Gangi/Eric Chramosta), will perform a unique and reimagined extended live score to Bone Cut (2017) inspired by Richmond and Gangi’s original score. Armed with parade of synthesizers, cable patches, tape loopers and pedals, the performance will also incorporate amplified mic loops arranged inside and outside the gallery.

Fake Estates is artist/musician, Matt Gangi and Eric Chramosta. Formally known as Gangi, Fake Estates, named after Gordon Matta-Clark’s seminal 1973 work, has performed across the United States and internationally. Recent performances include Faultline and Mirror/House curated by Epicenter Projects and Perpetual Dawn.

dxixprojects.com

09.06.16

Available Light (2013) on view at LACMA’s Stark Bar through January 2017

07.25.16

LACMA LENS: Photography Council 2016 Acquisitions: Available Light (2013)

Christopher Richmond, Available Light, 2013, 16mm color film transferred to HD video, sound, color, single screen projection, 20 minutes, 30 seconds, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, purchased with funds provided by LENS: Photography Council, 2016, © Christopher Richmond, courtesy of the artist and Moskowitz Bayse

unframed.lacma.org

04.02.16

Christopher Richmond in conversation with Jan Tumlir

Moskowitz Bayse is pleased to present Christopher Richmond in Conversation with Jan Tumlir, coinciding with Richmond’s exhibition Double Fantasy currently on view at the gallery. The speakers will explore the artist’s practice, as well as address his most recent works Panthalassa (2015) and Rendezvous (2016), both of which are featured in the exhibition.

moskowitzbayse.com

03.05.16

Double Fantasy, Moskowitz Bayse, March 5 – April 23, 2016

Moskowitz Bayse is pleased to announce Double Fantasy, the first major solo exhibition in the United States of works by Los Angeles-based artist Christopher Richmond. Double Fantasy features two new ambitious 16mm film and video works by the artist, and marks the artist’s first solo exhibition with the gallery.

Baffling and beautiful, Christopher Richmond makes films, videos, and photographs that challenge traditional story-telling conventions. Fixed meaning is subsumed in an animating tide of sound and light. By disrupting chronology, plot, and standard character development, Richmond invites the viewer to actively participate in the creation of meaning—to abandon the role of passive onlooker and become an active collaborator. Thematically, Richmond’s work explores the human condition, and his unconventional approach to narrative affords a range of alternate impressions.

In Panthalassa (2015), an eccentric cast sailing across an endless ocean at night hosts a series of otherworldly monologues where dream and reality become confused and creation myths collide with dialogue from sitcom television. Marooned for some unexplained reason on a boat in an uncertain time and in an ocean where the sun never seems to rise, it is not this state of limbo itself that threatens; rather, it is some unknown and irresistible force that lurks just beyond. In this fifty-minute, two-channel film scored by the Los Angeles band Xina Xurner and artist Elisa Harkins, the characters show a surprising capacity and predilection for irrational thinking.

In Rendezvous (2016), an asteroid sails closer and closer to earth, a stranger sits alone in a room, and aliens playfully wander in your backyard in a potent and playful commentary on extra-terrestrials, love, and the great unknown. Amidst this disorienting swirl and the interplay of image and sound, gesture and rhythm, and impassivity and emotion, a breakdown occurs and the everyday is made strange. 

Christopher Richmond (b. 1986 Solana Beach, CA) earned his MFA from the Roski School of Fine Arts at USC in 2014 and his BFA from Lawrence and Kristina Dodge College of Film and Media Arts at Chapman University in 2009. He received the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Emerging Artist grant in 2014. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

moskowitzbayse.com

12.04.15

Double in Brass, Lundgren Gallery, December 4 – February 28, 2016

Stefan Lundgren Gallery is pleased to present Christopher Richmond’s first solo exhibition at the gallery, Double in brass. In it, Richmond presents Panthalassa and The Milky Way, two hour long films completed in 2015. In Panthalassa and The Milky Way, Christopher Richmond blows past story and the possibility of it in pursuit of a kind of glorious and quixotic quest for quantities of joy, experience, and frustration, close only to the measureless quantity to those things that can be experienced everyday in real life.

Panthalassa (2015) follows an eccentric cast sailing across an endless ocean at night. Hosting a series of prosaic otherworldly dialogues where dream and reality become confused, the two-channel film follows their process of dreaming their way out of the world, while simultaneously trying to maintain control of it. Marooned for some unexplained reason on a boat in an uncertain time and in an ocean where the sun never seems to rise, it is not this state of limbo itself that threatens; rather, it is some unknown and irresistible force that lurks just beyond. Dancing between two screens, the characters show a surprising capacity and predilection for irrational thinking and as the themes of the film change from one context to the next, the film takes on the form of a series of aborted tales. The narrative progress of the film is consistently suspended while the characters become involved in matters of confinement and the great unknown amidst a flourish of dance music.

In the 16mm film, The Milky Way (2015), an unnamed humanoid giant encounters an array of characters living on the margins of society who share their thoughts, impassioned soliloquies, and beliefs about the world with it. With a round, placid face and deep-set eyes that intimate intelligence, the creature looks like a primordial being, but is clearly a special effect. It is an analog effect that reflects back on both the apparatus of the camera and on celluloid film’s concrete and illusive qualities. It is an analog inside the analog – a silent figure that represents a series of figures that have appeared throughout cinematic history but generally stand for the absence of language. It is a symbol of silence. There is a good deal of talking around it but it remains quiet and all seeing. Traveling by car through a myriad of landscapes, The Milky Way’s off-kilter characters are brought together under circumstances that are in and of themselves a bit unusual. Something is amiss in this world. Travel seems to happen, but without a destination; it is like some sort of primeval wandering in the Western canon.

Christopher Richmond makes photographs, films and videos that challenge traditional story-telling conventions. By disrupting chronology, plot, and standard character development, Richmond invites the viewer to actively participate in the creation of meaning—to abandon the role of passive onlooker and become an active collaborator. Thematically, Richmond’s work explores the human condition, and his unconventional approach to narrative affords a range of alternate impressions. He has shown his work widely, including exhibitions and screenings in Los Angeles, New York, and Europe. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

lundgrengallery.com

02.08.15

“Burn Slow” by Xina Xurner (Official Music Video) directed by Christopher Richmond

06.21.14

How do we distinguish random movements from signals? A gesture combines bodily movement and meaning (Nowiswhere, Issue 14)

A conversation between Barbara Kapusta and Christopher Richmond

Nowiswhere Issue 14

07.27.13

Dwelling in Erasure, curated by Alexandra Wetzel, Charlie James Gallery, July 27 – September 5, 2013

We may be the most restless people to date. We move around a lot. We see things remotely, we see things at speed, we find it hard to dwell on things. We exist in a constant state of arrival, neither fully here nor fully there. We click through endless images, constantly communicate through shifting platforms. Our jumbled experiences arrive out of order and in no particular order. Chronology removed, we are left in the perpetual now.

What happens then, when through artistic device, the context and point of origin are lost? By striping down, visually parsing the information presented, the viewer is left to identify with reduced space, dwelling in the experience without necessarily contextualizing it. This loss of context allows the viewer to reach a dream-like, tranquil state with shapes and objects that are familiar and whose potential readings are now doubled and tripled through redaction. To the dreamer, a dream is like reality and the anchor is not so much lost as it is displaced. Dwelling in Erasure brings together five artists working across all media who employ acts of removal and dislocation to suspend the viewer, creating quieter, contemplative moments allowing for reflection and simply being. 

Michael Henry Hayden’s and Chris Succo’s works appear like a blurred memory, faded or manipulated. Hayden’s use of ubiquitous domestic architecture allows the viewer to dwell in the memories of recorded non-moments. For Succo, it is not what to paint, but how to paint. While there is a layering to remove it is not random. The poetic decision of each gesture and composition is foregrounded. The process becomes the anchor.

Similarly, Christopher Richmond removes the narrative, the story—the very thing being told—to focus instead on the telling, the discourse. The viewer is left in a non-place, the loop seamless, the experience without orientation. Matthew Brandt’s and Bobbi Wood’s works literally paint over and wash away parts of the image until very little is left for the viewer to “hold on to.” This loss of context forces the viewer to hold tightly to what is left and from there to find a way out, to make out meaning.

*With special thanks to Tellef Tellefson, Dwyer Kilcollin and Randall Wetzel. 

cjamesgallery.com

09.04.12

APPROPRIATION Part II: Re-enactment – Recontextualization

from 04.09.2012 to 29.09.2012 Opening: Monday, 3 September, 7 p.m. Introductory talk: Petra Noll Accompanying program: Work presentation and screening –  G.R.A.M (A): Thuesday, 13 September 2012, 7 p.m.

Gerda Lampalzer, Rita Nowak, Sissa Micheli, G.R.A.M, Benjamin Tomasi, Akademie der Bildenden Künste Wien Projekt Tableau Vivant, Bernhard Garnicnig, Christopher Richmond

Because of the current noticeable affinity towards the use and recontextualization of found material in the work of many artists active in international art discourse the curatorial team of the FOTOGALERIE WIEN, together with art historian and curator Petra Noll, has developed APPROPRIATION as the special focus for this year. The conceptual basis is provided by the Appropriation Art of the 1970s and 1980s in which artists conceptually appropriated pre-existing art works. The tripartite series of exhibitions takes the subject a little further and presents photo and video artists who are involved with found footage material from very different contexts or employ strategies of re-enactment in order to open up new perspectives and pictorial realities.  Over and above the central themes of Appropriation Art – authorship and originality – the concern here is with issues of representation and perception, with the politics of social and cultural confrontations as well as with history, memory and identity. In the context of APPROPRIATION the mediums of photography and film which, per se, point in the direction of the past, offer an additional level for reflection.

The second exhibition in the series dealing with APPROPRIATION is presenting art projects based on the strategy of re-enactment. The artists represented in the show transcend the traditional concept of re-enacting stagings that already exist – e.g. in historical paintings/Tableaux Vivants – as authentically as possible. They appropriate their material from the visual arts but also, for example, from film, theatre, language and the print media in order to transfer them into the mediums of photography and film by means of action, role playing or physically putting themselves in the other’s place. Their art work is the research, analysis and, finally, transformation, recontextualization and redefinition. This modus operandi is often playful, ironic, cheeky – the whole complex spectrum of this subject. The concern is with reflecting on media, perception, narrative structures, on reality and fiction, ‘originals’ and ‘reproductions’ and, in the final analysis, with considerations of identity and social standardization. – Petra Noll, on behalf of the collective

fotogaleriewien.at

11.16.08

Painting the Sky Blue (2008) and Chasing the Horizon (2008) selected for the Szpilman Award 2008 shortlist.

award.szpilman.de